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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the national rifle association. >> reporter: wayne lapierre, the long-time executive vice president of the nra, took to the podium in washington just an hour or so after the national moment of remembrance. for a week, the nra had been silent, uncharacteristically silent as their opponents lambasted them. >> change, change, change! >> reporter: today, lapierre fired back. >> the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. but since when did the gun automatically become a bad word? i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> reporter: it was the classic nra crisis response. no retreat. no surrender. the answer to gun violence is, more guns, lapierre said, and rerailed against the very notion of gun-free school zones. >> they tell every insane killer in america that schools are the safest place to inflict maximum mayhem with minimum risk. >> reporter: lapierre really had another mission. blame. it's not guns, he argued, it's -- >> blood-soaked films out there, viole
a conservative republican who received the nra's highest ratings over four terms in congress. i saw this debate over guns as a powerful symbolic struggle between individual rights and government control. and you know what? in the years after waco and ruby ridge, the symbolism of that debate seemed even more powerful to me. but the symbols of that ideological struggle, they've been shattered by the harvest's own from violent, mind-numbing video games and gruesome hollywood movies that dangerously desensitize those who struggle with mental health challenges. and then add in military-styled weapons and high-capacity magazines to that equation, and tragedy can never be too far behind. you know, there's no easy ideological way forward. if it were only that simple as to blame hollywood or the nra or insufficient funding for mental health, then our task would be completed in no time. but i come to you this morning with a heavy heart and no easy answers. still, i've spent the past few days grasping for solutions and struggling for answers. while daring to question my own long-held belief on these subje
again today after a controversial nra news conference in washington. the "kudlow report" begins right now. >>> all right. let's first look at the market reaction to this fiscal cliff stuff. jackie joins us with the details. good evening, jackie. >> good evening to you, larry. while markets finished lower on the day, they were higher on the week. the dow up about .5%, the nasdaq higher by 1.7%, and the s&p 500 up by roughly 1.2% over the last five days. meantime in terms of sector performance, the financials, they had a rough day. the plan "b" proposal for the fiscal cliff. up more than 3% for the week. also technology and materials they finished lower on the day, as well, but higher for the week. the worst-performing sectors this week, consumer staples, telco, and health care, and in terms of the individual stocks that we were watching on the s&p 500 nyse was bigger with a 30% upside after news of that $8.2 billion deal to be acquired by the intercontinental exchange. to the downside, it was electronic arts logging a loss on concerns there will be more scrutiny on violent video games
there in newtown on friday morning. i'll read it to our viewers from the nra. the nra is made up of four million moms and dads, be sons and daughters, and we were shocked, saddened, and heartbroken by the news of the horrific and senseless murders in newtown. out of respect for the families and as a matter of common decency, we have given time for a mourning, prayer and full investigation of thes before commenting. the nra is prepared to offer meaningful contributions to help make sure that this never happens. that's the first public statement since the killings here in newtown friday morning. the nra also says it will hold a major news conference this coming friday, december 21st, in washington, d.c. of course, we'll cover that as well. >>> there has been another deadly shooting in colorado. police say four people are dead in a murder-suicide. lisa sylvester is monitoring that. what do you have, lisa? >> wolf, it's a disturbing story of a woman's 911 strategy. it happened in colorado. authorities say as the call for help came in, a dispatcher heard gunshots, a man saying he was going to kill hi
laws. >> shame on the nra! >> reporter: as demonstrators marched on nra headquarters, phone calls poured in to congressional offices. >> okay, so you're in support of gun control legislation? >> reporter: kentucky democrat john yarmuth says most of the calls have been in favor of new gun restrictions. as a democrat from a conservative southern state, yarmuth says he avoided the issue for the past six years. but now he wants to reinstate the ban on assault weapons. >> nothing's going to bring back those 20 children and six very courageous educators. but we can make sure that's our inspiration, battle cry. and i won't be quiet anymore. >> reporter: neither will senator joe manchin of west virginia. like yarmuth, he has a record of being pro-gun rights. he even fired in a campaign ad. after friday's shooting, manchin says there must be a way to limit the purchase of high-capacity magazines. >> this is not about the second amendment to our constitution or taking guns away. it's been having an intelligent conversation. >> reporter: that conversation has dried up in recent years in the
under having reasonable gun controls sunday the second amendment. >> the nra has made a statement today. the key part saying they're prepared to make meaningful contributions to make sure this doesn't happen again. >> don't hold your breath. >> jeffrey, tell me this annoying -- what did he call me, a bucolic brit. as someone who went through, very similar, the children same age killed. which means we only get 35 gun letters a year. it's the same in australia. many european companies have a similar rate. we just don't get how the nr are a is apparently so powerful that it's able to dictate policy on this on the way it does. is that going to change that michael bloomberg came out and said stop being so terrified of the nra. >> i think nra is just as powerful as they have been. and they have all the time in the world. the news media, we have a short attention span. six months from now, we're not going to be covering this story around the clock. but the nra is going to be working even harder. any debate about gun control will start to get bogged down in details which do you band, do you ban
that enjoys wide support in the public, even among nra gun owners. >> it would not have helped in this case, though. we know that these guns in this particular case, in this tragedy, which is what has really, i think, kind of grabbed people's attention finally, if you will, that would not have made a difference. >> and that's the unfortunate reality of having guns in a free society is that we can't stop all violent acts. but there are some pretty easy measures that are agreed upon by many people, such as having background checks. and that, i think, is a starting point. and then beyond that, we can have discussions. that to me is the best way to do this. >> steven barton, thank you for talking with us this morning. we appreciate it. we saw a lot from the mayors against illegal guns. they've really been leveraging off this issue to make their position known and maybe get some traction for their issues. want to get right back to zoraida sambolin. she's been covering the details of the victims, as john's been mentioning all morning, we really wanted to focus on those who lost their lives and no
television right now, they don't want to come on. they're hiding away, as are members of the nra and all the usual suspects when these terrible things happen. are you detecting, senator, that there is change in mood? are you hoping this is a tipping point? >> yes, i hope so, piers. i had to do a brief segment on "meet the press" yesterday morning. and afterwards, i probably got 20 phone calls at home here in washington. very unusual, people from washington and california calling and saying we want to help with this. it's got to stop. i even had one man who was a member of the nra who said i have an ar-15, and i'm going to get rid of it. i'm a hunter, and i want you to do something about these assault weapons. so i'm going to do my level best to try. i did it once before in 1993. we sat down and we wrote a bill, and that bill passed the senate. chuck schumer introduced it in the house. it passed. it was not amended. it was passed. and it went to the president. president clinton signed it, and it was the law for ten years. and over time, it began to wind down the supply of these weapons. a
washington, the one place we are not hearing anything about it, zoraida, is from the nra. they've not made a statement sense a written statement on friday. they've suspended their facebook page and twitter feed has remained silent. zoraida? >> emily, i understand you also have new polls to share with us this morning. >> we have three different polls that are really showing a potential spike in public opinion change on this. i want to start with one from cbs news that was taken just over the weekend saying do you think gun control rules should be more strict or less strict? there has been a significant change in this. since more strict, 57% say that now compared to 39% back in april. the amount of people who think the gun control should be less strict has dropped. similar findings from an abc news/"washington post" poll, do you support or oppose stricter gun control laws? take a look at how that number has gone up since august. one more interesting thing, the pugh research center asked people do you think the shootings reflect a larger societal problem in their polls say 47% of americans th
it done? >> well, they probably don't have the votes today. it will be interesting to see what the nra who is going to be making press announcements tomorrow start to say and whether they start letting some members off the hook on assault weapons bans. i don't know if they will, but i can tell you this. the nra has four million members. you know, the campaigns like mayors against illegal guns and others, within a few weeks they are going to have four million members. this is just not going to be tolerated in the same way anymore. and senators like scott brown may end up being kind of the first test on this. he made that crafty statement because he opposed a federal bill in the past. >> you mean the state should have the responsibility. >> right. but he knew as a senator that it was never going to pass. he was the number one recipient of nra money in his campaign over this last year. a lot of senators are going to find themselves in the cross hairs because of taking all of that money and when he comes back to -- tries to come back to the senate, that may very well be a big issue. >> like jo
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)